Category Archive: Uncategorized

Creating Opportunities in Your Legal Career in 2021

Despite the world continuing the second year of a global pandemic, there are ways to create opportunities for your legal career in 2021, according to an article published by the American Bar Association (“ABA”) Journal. The feature is based on an interview of a co-founder and CEO of a legal recruiting firm and provides great tips on how to move your career forward even in today’s environment.

Tips to Follow

 

According to a leading legal recruiter, the industry has changed significantly over the past few decades. One pivotal factor in this change was the birth of social networks. 20 years ago, the recruiting business was paper-based and time-consuming. Online recruiting tools did not exist and LinkedIn — a huge game changer in career development — had yet to be born. Couple this with a significant change in how people communicate and the speed in which a recruiter must identify and coordinate with candidates is critical.

 

Important trends in the legal recruiting industry, according to the ABA Journal interview include:

Positions in highest demand: While demand does change from year to year, as of early 2021 the most important positions are focused on revenue generation. This is because businesses are seeking income — which is important even when times are good — due to the global pandemic’s impact on their organizations. For these reasons hot jobs include strong sales professionals, those with data privacy experience, as well as project managers.

 

Qualities and experience employers want: Many companies are not just looking for talent that will strengthen their business and its teams, but they also want stability. This means that individuals who may have job hopped throughout their career may be less attractive to a potential employer. Likewise, companies are considering a candidate’s ability to embrace the culture as an important hiring factor. Some companies are being even more cautious on who they bring into the remote work environment.

 

Career advancement: Company leaders, department heads, recruiters, and talent managers all look at LinkedIn first to make an initial decision on a candidate, so make sure your profile is perfected. This means highlighting key areas that are attractive to potential employers, modeling your description after those you want to emulate, sharing personal interests that may relate to the role, and obtaining certifications or other skills if appropriate.

 

Interviewing tips: During an interview, be sure to emphasize how you fit with the company based on your background, experience, and interests in addition to your skills. Come into the conversation with familiarity with the organization and its team so you can highlight your compatibilities. Finally, because stability is important, if you get the job and it is challenging, try to find ways to adapt instead of leaving. Try to stay in any role for at least two years — but three years is better.

 

The entirety of the interview can be accessed at Reinventing Professionals.

 

 

 

 

Tips for Young Litigators

It is not uncommon to feel intimidated by litigation and legal advocacy, especially if you are a new lawyer. No matter how much exposure a law student has — such as trial advocacy, moot court, judicial clerkships, or advice from seasoned attorneys and law professors — nothing truly prepares you for “real world” lawyering. Below are some helpful tips, according to the American Bar Association (“ABA”) Journal for aspiring litigators as they start their journey and career in the courtroom.

  • Manage your caseload: Deadlines are the driving force of litigating. New and young associates are expected to keep ahead of all pending deadlines. They must do so for their own cases as well as for their firm’s partners. This includes court appearances, expert reports, discovery demands, depositions, and trial dates. You must be extremely organized to avoid mistakes. Remember that while assistants calendar deadlines, at the end of the day it is the attorney’s ultimate responsibility to properly handle a client’s case.
  • Always be prepared: Be prepared from the initial consultation through the finalization of the case. Having a form document for consultations will help you better assess a potential client’s case. Once you are working on a case, make sure to familiarize yourself with the file. Speak with the client often to make sure you are managing expectations. Also, get to know the judge on the case and learn his or her idiosyncrasies. Also know the applicable case law and relevant statutes for your client’s matter. Finally, trust that your preparation and instincts will help you overcome surprises.
  • Protect your reputation: Understand that an attorney’s reputation is key to his or her legal career. Your behavior, words, and professionalism will affect not just your reputation, but that of your client and your firm. And, depending on your area of practice, the legal community can be a small one. While litigation can involve conflict, stress, and emotions, do not let the deteriorating relationship between the parties in the lawsuit affect your behavior. Understand that zealous advocacy and legal representation can coexist with professional courtesy, adherence to the rules and law, and fair tactics. Also, be on time so that you do not upset the other side or even face sanctions.

Takeaway

Although you may be early in your legal career, trust your instincts and the quality of your work product. Get with a mentor and learn as much as possible from him or her, even when the advice is hard to listen to. Following the above tips will help start your legal journey and keep you on the right path for years to come.

Thank You!

While the world is going through this difficult time dealing with COVID-19, we wanted to take a moment to thank our clients for their continued support.  We really appreciate you!

Remote Depositions: The New Normal Due To COVID-19

Remote depositions are becoming the new normal for the legal profession amid the COVID-19 pandemic.  One common concern from attorneys is can the witness be sworn in remotely.  The Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 30(b)(4) and similar state rules, such as O.C.G.A. § 9-11-30(4) authorize remote depositions by stipulation of the parties or court order.

Following Governor Brian Kemp’s declaration of a state health emergency in Georgia, Justice Melton issued a statewide judicial emergency limiting court functions and suspended or otherwise granted relief from a number of statutory judicial deadlines.

Currently the order will remain in effect until April 13, 2020.  During this time, EGCR is waiving any web or videoconferencing fees as long as EGCR is not required to provide a location or equipment outside of EGCR’s facility.  Standard deposition rates will apply.

Our team is working diligently to prepare our staff and our clients for the best experience possible.  Below are some helpful links.

Schedule your deposition

View the remote deposition checklist

Upload Exhibits

We urge our clients if they run into a situation that is unique, to call or email our office so we can provide a solution.

We also have a comprehensive YouTube tutorial on web depositions, along with other tutorials.

We believe remote depositions will continue to be relevant in the future for situations relating to weather.  Georgia can shut down for a week at a time due to weather.  You no longer have to.

While, during this crisis, the EGCR and Ancillary teams are working remotely to prevent the spread of COVID-19, we are still available to answer your questions or concerns.